Andreja Brulc's Blog

Twiddlemuff: Knitting for Dementia

Posted in Craft, Projects by andrejabrulc on 21/05/2015

Have you ever heard of twiddlemuffs? Nor did I, until last Friday! Please read on, if interested.

As this week (17–23 May 2015) is the Dementia Awareness Week, I decided to have a go in making my first twiddlemuff in order to support a patient with dementia as part of the Forget-Me-Not project carried out by various NHS Foundation Trusts across the UK (for your local one see Dementia Action Alliance) asking knitters to contribute into. I am not a professional knitter but I use various craft techniques using yarn in the making of my illustrations and art projects. Knitting and crocheting reconnect me to the roots of my earlier female generations, so I am very grateful to my mum and grandmother who taught me all these ‘skills-for-life’ when I was a child, so that I am now able to make this contribution to a sad but beautiful project of LTC – Love, Tender and Care.

twiddlemuffe_bottom

What are Twiddlemuffs?

According to Bradford Teaching Hospital (the link has the pattern & instructions), twiddlemuffs are knitted hand muffs using various left-over yarn and being decorated with interesting bits and bobs attached inside and out. ‘They have been designed and developed to provide simple stimulation for active hands, while promoting increased flexibility and brain stimulation.’ Furthermore, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital says that people with dementia ‘often have restless hands and like to have something to keep their hands occupied.’ The twiddlemuff ‘provides a wonderful source of visual, tactile and sensory stimulation and at the same time keeping hands snug and warm.’

Not only is, as recent studies have shown, the craft of knitting a therapy for depression – depression is one of the risk factors for developing dementia – but I also learn from Alzheimer’s Society that people with dementia remain involved in the community through knitting. As Adele Lacy, Dementia Support Worker, who runs Knit2gether group, says:

‘I thought of knitting because, even when people have forgotten everything else, it is an automatic skill which never goes. People might not be able to do a lot of things but knitting is something they can still remember and it is great for the members to see a finished product and think “I did that”.’

twiddlemuffe_top

Dedication of my Twiddlemuff

To me, it is impossible to imagine all the harrowing emotions charged, both, from the prospective of the diagnosed patient seeing one’s own inner decay as the illness progresses and from the prospective of his or her family. I have recently watched Julianne Moore’s outstanding performance in Still Alice, playing a role of a linguistic professor diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The film is so emotionally powerful, shown through the eyes of someone, who faces ‘a harrowing challenge as this terminal degenerative neurological ailment slowly progresses to an inevitable conclusion’ that we, survivors of the afflicted, all dread.

Also, over the last few years I have witnessed how my very close friend of mine (and his family) was coping and was emotionally effected by his father’s Alzheimer’s, who was given a full care at home with all LTC from the onset of the diagnosis to his recent death. I, therefore, thought I would dedicate my twiddlemuff in the memory of my friend’s father. I only wished I had known about these twiddlemuffs earlier!

twiddlemuffe_before decorationThe Story in the Making of my Twiddlemuff

As an image creator, often working according to briefs, I enjoy opportunities where I can experiment without rational thinking! I love building up stories that take me to the unknown, as I am interested in how different stories, through recycling and collaging, come together to make a new narrative. For this kind of experimentation I keep various kinds of boxes containing ‘bits and bobs’ – a Wunderkammer of history when things get pulled out!

As my friend and his family could not stop giving all the LTC to his father right to the end, for which I admired them so much, I thought that the overall design for my twiddlemuff needed to express that. I added a cross-stitched ‘LTC’ on the inside right at the end, but the overall design, however, really began to develop from the red and white striped ribbon with hearts before the base was even finished. The ribbon came with a Christmas present – a home-made jar of pickled herring –, given to me by my Danish colleague in 2007, and made and beautifully wrapped by her mum. In addition to the hearts, the reds became the centre to the colour scheme – also, because I wanted to include the left-over wool in bright red that my mum used to knit a striped jumper for me, which I wore when I started school back in mid 70s! It is here used as a central stripe and also for stitched outlined hearts. Furthermore, although a flower motive – daisies, fuchsia and, needless to say, most importantly, a forget-me-not – is more appropriate for a female patient, my friend’s dad was a very keen gardener, so it does make sense after all to add a touch of beauty from nature. Last, as the act of knitting is paramount to this LTC cause – to knit for the patients and the patients to knit –, it is important to pass such skills to younger generations as knitting is ‘an automatic skill that never goes away’. As I taught my little niece a stocking stitch a few years ago and as the twiddlemuff is meant to be embellished with buttons among many other things, I added one button, which I had to remove from her first-communion dress by her order! Although she and buttons are not best friends, she found it rather amusing that her ‘unlikable’ friend found its prominent place in the middle of the big heart!

As patients with dementia love hearing stories being told, I decided at the end to add a pocket in order to carry a note with all these amusing anecdotes in the making of his or her new twiddlemuff! Of course, I shall omit my friend’s dad’s story. R.I.P.

twiddlemuffe_after decoration

Advertisements

Graphic Design and UK General Elections 2015

Posted in Graphic Design by andrejabrulc on 09/05/2015

As the first time voter (originally from Slovenia) in the UK General Elections 2015, I cannot resist but summarise my ‘lasting’ impressions of ‘the unique’ experience at the polling station into 5 points from the point of view of my profession as a graphic designer: ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN, TYPE, PAPER & PENCIL. The below may all seem normal to you but it somehow does not to someone with different experiences and expectations!

Architecture

As soon as the polling stations opened across the United Kingdom last Thursday, my Facebook feeds began to flood with images (due to copyright please see images directly from The Huffington Post) showing ARCHITECTURAL choices for these settings, which express, on the one hand, a positive aspect of UK’s uniqueness and eccentricity that has managed to grip on traditions for so many decades despite the globalised vision of the political elite at Westminster (let me remind you of the secret TTIP pact as discussed by Lee Williams of The Independent and why we should be scared of), while, on the other hand, The Huffington Post shows how rundown the Middle England actually still is well into the 21st century! It does not come to my surprise, really, as the examples of these settings show, at least to me as an outsider, that not much has really changed for ‘an ordinary’ British citizen since the time of Margaret Thatcher when I visited UK for the first time at a teenager back in 1986. The power and money are still centered on London and nothing will ever change unless British people are ready to do so! But who wants the change when the comfort of ‘our loos’ is just what we want it! The country – and London, for that matter – was in mid-80s so rundown in all aspects of life it gave me a real culture shock! It was so messy but I loved it for multiculturalism! Back to the point of last Thursday, even Slovenia, with 1/3 of UK GDP is ‘better off’ when it comes down to the architectural setting chosen for the election day! I wonder how many affordable accommodations will come out at the end of the 5 year period of the currently elected government! I do hope for some more comfortable settings for our polling stations, though, rather than portaloos, pliz!

Paper

The ‘grabby’ ballot PAPER you were given looked worse than a primary school print out! Fair enough, we were told – as soon as the figures from the exit poll came out and froze the drink in our hands before it reached our mouths – that the weight of the paper was especially chosen as light so that volunteers did not strain their backs when carrying ballot boxes to the counting people. Thank you, volunteers, what a great job you did, very much appreciated. And thank you local councils/constituencies to think about people’s backs! So more important now since ‘the majority’ of British people won’t be able to afford a private health care to treat our backs!

Design

The ballot paper was so poorly DESIGNED that even a pre-school kid would have done a better job of it on his/her parents’ computer! The kid would have wanted to add some colour to identify parties with as most people do so; he/she would have made the text bolder so that partially sighted people could see it better; and certainly, he/she would not have positioned the text so crookedly that on my sample it almost fell of the page! Bad design! The design is so paramount to get the right message across whatever it may be – if I am not mistaken, the last USA election, bringing Bush Junior back in power, had a flawed design that effected many voters across the States!

Type

You had to put an ‘X’ SYMBOL as the choice of your vote. Correct me if I am mistaken, the ‘X’ goes back to times when people could not write and used the ‘X’ as a form of signature. Hence, again to an outsider, to put the ‘X’ on a ballot paper – in a country with 99.7% literacy rate – in the 21st century is so patronising! More to the point, how many people who, like myself, have become British citizens at some point in their lives understand the symbol as YES! Let’s not discuss the symbol in relation to exams or homework and so on, where the symbol means as a WRONG answer, but in this instance, contrary to Britain, in many, if not most, cultures an X simply means a NO, full stop! I assume that these people have learnt their lesson by now! I would have put a TICK, had I not been warned about it just before I left home. Would my tick count? Probably not.

Pencil

The last point and what was really surprising, and please tell me if that is normal, I was given a PENCIL to make my ‘loving’ X hoping for better Britain! A pencil about 3 cms (1 inch) long! I know our local governments are on a tight budget but … Well, here is definitely something to think about. I was simply shocked when I was given the pencil! Over the years I had to work hard on learning ‘to trust’ (trustworthiness was not at the top of agenda when growing up back in ex-Yugoslavia) or ‘to accept everything is being said to be true’ but, at my age, I am not naive enough to accept the general assumption that the ‘X cannot be rubbed out’! Thumps down!

To sum up, going to a polling station seems to have been a form of entertainment for ‘many people’, a kind of ‘political tourism’ (please read ‘many people’ as those who swing between parties depending on ‘the direction of the wind’)! I really really ask myself how ‘many of these people’ really understood what policies they were voting for. Have they read manifestoes of all the parties and compared them? I know they were boring, too many promises, but still … Have they thought at all about what kind of consequences each party can have long-term on their lives, their children, their parents? It is not only about a 5 year term but many years to come! Was the election for them, for British people, or the elected few at Westminster? Tax on beer became lower at the last budget session but it is bound to go up at the next but what about the rest? Based on ‘X’ system, and to end with another typographical symbol, the answer to all my questions, in my opinion, is probably a big ‘0’!

 

Typographic Project: Edible Valentine Type: Love & Kisses

Posted in MEXICO, Projects by andrejabrulc on 28/02/2014

This series of typographic cookies was inspired by my research on Mexican pan dulce – the idea is based on a particular variety of pan dulce [‘sweet bread’] called besos [‘kisses’], which are especially popular in Mexico for Valentine’s Day.

Andreja Brulc_besos

The idea was then expanded further into a typographic feast in 5 languages (English, Spanish, Slovene, Italian, German) using the words ‘kisses’ and ‘love’ as the basis for this project (the final result is the last image below). Furthermore, my project of edible type coincided with the Valentine theme set out to celebrate the first anniversary of Type Tasting led by Sarah Hyndman of With Relish – for Type Tasting’s review of my project click here.

Andreja Brulc_kisses

Recipes

4 different kinds of recipes were used for these cookies:

Besos from Tennie CakesBesos are not cookies per se, but pan dulce, a sort of sweet scorn-like breads.

Shortbread from BBCShortbread was shaped into letters by hand. Some letters were further dipped into a melting chocolate to give some colour to the type and sprinkled with icing sugar and chopped up hazelnuts. The recipe for these world’s famous biscuits, which originated in Scotland, is exceptionally good – in my opinion, it is in a high competition with the famous brand, Walkers Shortbread. For European readers – caster sugar, known in the States as ‘superfine’ sugar, is a British term for sugar with small grains that are between granulated and icing sugar. If you cannot find caster sugar, use ordinary white sugar rather than icing sugar. Your food mixer will do the rest!

Andreja Brulc_love_2

Jam-filled butter biscuits from BBC – A classic British recipe for Jammie Dodgers and a perfect one to sandwich ‘red’ jam between the two hearts. Again, my variation of the recipe came out to be more ‘Central European’ in appearance in order to make the type more diverse when assembled! Traditionally, Jammie Dodgers have a shape (e.g heart) cut out on the top layer, so that the jam is visible through it like in the BBC recipe, but, instead, I decided to make a template of the heart and lettering, placed on the top layer and then sprinkled in icing sugar.

Andreja Brulc_Valentine cookies_4

Andreja Brulc_love_3

Chocolate truffles from BBC – Very simple but extremely delicious truffles – I had to keep them away from many long fingers before I managed to finish with photographing the project! It is worth using a good quality chocolate (70%). For the decoration, the truffles were sprinkled with unsweetened cocoa powder, chopped up hazelnuts and coconut powder.

Andreja Brulc_truffles

The making of edible Valentine type

The cookies were either shaped into type before they were baked, but in most cases they were assembled into type after the baking and then photographed.

Andreja Brulc_poljubAndreja Brulc_ljubezenAndreja Brulc_amorWhen all letters were finally assembled in Photoshop into two words in 5 languages, the final outcome was a very satisfying typographic Valentine feast that fed my family for a few days!

Andreja Brulc_Valentine card

‘Lost and Found’: Typographic Easter

Posted in Lost and Found by andrejabrulc on 06/04/2013

In my post of last year on how to dye Easter Eggs in onion skin with leaf pattern as part of the ‘Lost and Found’ series, I explained the reason why the ‘lost and found’ notion was applied in the method of dying eggs traditionally used in Slovenia. This year I decided to push my culinary skills even further – I pulled my sleeves and set on the adventure of making another essential item traditionally prepared for the Easter feast (and Christmas) in Slovenia – the baking of potica. I have never done this kind of roll before, so for me it was ineed the beginning of the new adventure! Potica is a culinary symbol of Slovenia from where it spread around the world, so I thought that this festive roll ought to serve as the base for my typographic touch!Happy Easter_2

The context

Potica, also known as povitica, is a yeast-raised sweet dough rolled with a variety of fillings (apparently around 50 different kinds of fillings are used), but the most famous filling traditionally used is without doubt a walnut paste.

Potica is first mentioned in historical documents in 1575. It is also famously described as a festive dish in The Glory of the Duchy of Carnolia, a historical and typographical account of the Slovenian lands under the Habsburgs in the 17th century by a Carnolian nobleman, scientist, polymath and a fellow of the Royal Society (London) named Johann Weikhard von Valvasor.  Some researchers claim that its origins go back even further in history. For instance, the ethnographer Damjan J. Ovsec suggests that potica was already prepared in medieval monasteries by nuns. The linguists also point out that the word potica comes from the Latin word ‘potissmus’ suggesting a cake that is very tasty and delicious. Such a cake would at the time normally be prepared in the monasteries for church dignitaries, from where it would spread through the social strata via feudal lords (castle) to townspeople (towns) and peasants (villages).

Method

Every family has its favourite recipe and can vary from one household to the next. My method of making it comes from my childhood memory of how both my grandma and my mum took a great care in the preparation of the ingredients needed for the baking and how they tackled the whole process.

The rule number one: the selection of walnuts in particular is considered very important – their age and whether they are dried properly and so on! My whole family would gather around the kitchen table a few nights before in order to engage ourselves in crashing the walnuts out of their shell – of course, one went into my tummy, the other on the floor and the third one onto the pile for the roll! All recipes suggest that you ought to grind the walnuts very finely but I broke the rule – my electric blender is a bit outdated so it ground them between fairly fine to medium. The paste came out a bit more coarse than usual but in my opinion it was an improvement!

The rule number two: beat the dough until smooth and filled with bubbles. I remember my grandma and my mum how they leaned over their large metal pot laboriously beating their yeast dough for ages. This process is apparently essential but I decided to break the rule yet again and kneaded it instead (circa 10 mins).

The rule number three: before your start, leave out all the ingredients to the room temperature (1 hour). I recall how my mum yelled at us if one of us left the door open while the dough was being raised! It is important that your kitchen is warm during the making, so absolutely no draughts are allowed!

The rule number four: all Slovene recipes suggest you use fresh yeast – to which you add warm milk and sugar – in order to raise it first before it is added to the rest. But no need for the fresh yeast (which is hard to find in London!) as dry one does the job just the same – you sieve it into the flour and then add all the ingredients!Slovenska kuharica

However, the list of ingredients and their proportions were taken from my dilapidated copy of the Slovene cookery book (1970) written by a nun called Felicita Kalinsek, who is famous in Slovenia for her writing and teaching on cooking. You may laugh – but I was taught by her how to cook when I was 14! I have been embarrassed by this for a long time (being sent to a nunnery by parents to do knitting, crocheting and cooking) but now I am more than delighted to write this down! After all, all the best cooking, historically speaking, was perfected in monasteries!

Dough

Ingredients

1 liter bread flour (approx 630 g)
1 pack dry yeast (weight for 630 g flour)
1/4 liter warm milk (you can add a bit more later depending on the dryness of your flour)
100 g butter
1 lemon grind
1 drop vanilla extract
4 egg yolks (the recipe suggests 2 to 5 but I would say the fewer the softer the dough but less yellow and tasty!)
1/2 teaspoon salt and sugar

Instructions

1. Sieve the flour into a large bowl. Make a hole in the flour, into which you sieve the dry yeast.
2. In a separate bowl, mix warm milk, butter, sugar and yolks.
3. Add the mixture to the flour and add the salt.
4. Mix all together until the dough is fairly dry. Then knead the dough for 10 mins.
5. Leave the dough in a larger bowl to raise (approx 1-2 hours depending on the warmth in your kitchen, or radiator if you have not got much time!). Meanwhile, prepare the filling.

Filling

Ingredients

70 g butter
3 egg yolks (2 egg whites)
250 g sugar
1 lemon grind
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
4 large spoon single cream
1 liter walnuts (when ground, separate walnuts evenly into two bowls – 50:50)
1/2 teaspoon salt and sugar

Instructions

1. Mix butter with egg yolks and sugar until creamy.
2. Add spices, cream, half a litter of walnuts and whisked egg whites.

Preparing the roll

1. Use the dough roller to flatten your dough so that it is about 1cm thick.
2. Evenly distribute the wet filling onto the flat dough. Sprinkle the second (dry) part of the walnuts on top.
3. Optionally you can add raisins (not sultanas). Generally I am not so keen on ‘squashed flies’, but as my potica was made for my British family who like raisins, I used the largest ones (approx 1-2 cm tall) I could find in our corner shop – and I am now converted! Sultanas = ‘squashed flies’ versus large raisings = ‘the real thing’!
4. Roll the dough as tightly as you can into one long roll. The roll was then cut into 3 even parts (approx 20cm long) to fit my bread tins. Each piece was topped with cream and smoothed with a brush.
5. Raise potica while in tins for another hour. Then bake it for approx 1 hour at 170 degrees (fan oven). Note: if it is browning too fast on top, place some aluminium foil to prevent the crust from burning!

France Prešeren’s New Outfit Installation / May 2010

Posted in Craft, Projects by andrejabrulc on 30/05/2010
Baptism at the River Savica

Baptism at the River Savica

Art installation in process

The monument dedicated to the most important Slovene poet, France Prešeren (1800-49), which stands in the central square of Ljubljana, was transformed for a day (21 May 2010) during the Fabula Festival, the central event of Ljubljana time as UNESCO World Book Capital 2010.  This public art installation gave the poet a new outfit covered in hand-made lettering from stanzas of his longest work in verse, Baptism at the River Savica.

I was very pleased with the final outcome of the work, which took almost a month to complete. Also, when finally installed, I was especially relieved to see that the tunic fitted the poet as if made-to-measure, when in reality I had to work with the tailor Lidija Kešnar around the measurements I made from a photograph.

Passers-by

And the hard work indeed paid off. The project was received very well by passers-by – and many of them took out their cameras! I was especially pleased with the comment by somebody from the City Museum who shared his appreciation for the project by saying that the installation was “more than culture” and that the city of Ljubljana needed projects like this.

Above all, I was particularly pleased that the media was interested in covering the project on TV Slovenia 1 as well as in print and online. For a full report of the project, photos and video of the installation showing my interview with the journalist Živa Rogelj see  RTV Slovenia, who said that “Prešeren was stoically coping with the adornment, while two other statues nearby were observing this moment in silence”.

Young typo enthusiasts, Živa and Luka

A report by the Slovene Press Agency was published in the national newspaper Dnevnik among others. Also, A.H. wrote in an article titled “Prešeren v novi preobleki” published in the national newspaper Dnevnik (22 May 2010) that Prešeren’s longest work in verse, Baptism at the River Savica, had received “a form as never seen before” and that “the project gave Ljubljana a new artistic inspiration”.

The tunic was only displayed for a day, but it is hoped that there will be other opportunities to show it for a longer period, or even that a more permanent place of display can be found.

Art installation for a day in all weather conditions

Many many thanks to the organiser, Študentska založba, who supported my project idea. A special thanks to my family for their moral support during the month and particularly to my mum who helped me with the making of the letters. And finally, thanks to the tough guys, Marko Murč and Primož Kuharič of Študentska založba, who helped me to install the new outfit, very heavy in weight indeed.

Installation team

More installation photos on Flick.

Press Release: France Prešeren’s New Outfit / May 2010

Posted in Craft, Projects by andrejabrulc on 20/05/2010

UNESCO World Book Capital 2010: France Prešeren’s New Outfit (Baptism at the River Savica)

Location: Prešeren Square, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Date and time: Friday, 21 May, from 8 am – 23 pm

Summary

The monument dedicated to the most important Slovene poet, France Prešeren (1800-49), which stands in the central square of Ljubljana, will be transformed for a day during the Fabula Festival, the central event of Ljubljana’s time as UNESCO World Book Capital 2010. A public art installation, giving Prešeren a new outfit covered in hand-made lettering from stanzas of the poet’s longest work in verse, Baptism at the River Savica, will be realised by the designer and illustrator Andreja Brulc.

Concept

The sculpture of the poet will be draped in a unique black tunic (pallerina), which is stylistically reminiscent of the cloaks fashionable during the time of the poet. The tunic will have a larger collar made out of a fine velvet, which will overhang the poet’s shoulders and will be tightened around the neck with a large bow. The tunic will then be divided into two parts at the back of the lower part of his legs and will continue in a billowing manner down each side of the pedestal to the first step of the monument. The statue is about 3 metres tall, with an additional 2 metres for the pedestal.

The selection of the text will be from the most important passages from the poem, and in particular those that are part of the school curriculum. The emphasis is especially on the connection of two vital speeches between Črtomir and Bogomila, the main protagonists of the poem. The purpose of the selection, and the execution of the whole design, is to conceptually connect the iconic status of the public monument to the work produced by the poet himself and the private voices of the speakers in the poem.

The text, executed in an experimental typographical manner, will run with the male voice on one side and the female voice on the other side of the poet’s sculptural body. The text begins at the same height as the book that the poet is holding, and this gives the impression of the letters falling from the pages. The overall design and experimental letter forms give a strong sense of the text travelling, coming closer and further away, and in this way attract the attention of readers, inviting them to read the poem.

Technique and material

The principal technique for transferring the text on the cloth is stenciling. The visual impact of the experimental typography is enhanced by the combination in the use of traditional techniques, such as sewing and stitching, knitting and crocheting, and patchwork letters made from textiles.

For more photos see on Flickr at http://www.flickr.com/photos/39890289@N05/sets/72157623978334159/

Photos of the tunic installed on the monument still to come.

Type Tard Card

Posted in Projects by andrejabrulc on 29/06/2009

My response to the project run by Type and Wallpaper* to support the St Bride’s Library in London. The brief required an A6 card either for a typeface or a letter of the alphabet. The card had to follow the style of prostitutes’ advertising cards in London, but based around typographic, illustrative and photographic ideas. My card uses the font Akzidenz Grotesk.

© Andreja Brulc

Ephemeral symbol of London as they may be, tart cards are one of the strongest images I have from my first visit to a big city as a teenager in the mid 80s. Even before you would step into a red telephone box in central London to call your parents to reassure them you were safe and doing just fine, you would be confronted with messages and images that, retrospectively, may frighten your parents had they known from what kind of environment they received a long-distance call from their daughter! But days are also numbered for tart cards as, I understand, internet and mobile phones are taking their place.

Type says that “so pervasive are these things, and so curious is their typography, images and copy writing they are now regarded as items of accidental art and have something of a cult following. Once on the periphery of design, the cards have influenced the work of many mainstream artists including Royal Academician Tom Philips and Sex Pistols designers, Ray and Nils Stevenson.”

Wallpaper* features the project in its first issue on sex and culture this July. In addition to all cards being shown on the magazine’s website, all entries are also exhibited in KK Outlet in London, from 22 to 29 June. Among participants are superstars Erik Kessels, Anthony Burrill, Neville Brody, NB:Studio, Value and Service, Fernando Guiterrez, Ian Wright and Noma Bar. It is intended a book of the project will be published, profits’ to be donated to St Bride Library. At the end of the Project the collection will be donated to the St Bride Library.

Wallpaper* says that the intention of this project is “to highlight the serious issue that lies at the heart of the world of tart cards – the plight of trafficked women in the sex industry. It is a subject touched eloquently on by Mike Dempsey of Studio Dempsey, who is a volunteer at the Helen Bamber Foundation which helps rebuild lives broken by human rights violations. While our exhibition is an ode to the graphic qualities of the tart card phenomena, Dempsey’s design is a pertinent reminder of the sinister world that lies beneath every card.”

%d bloggers like this: